June 4th, 2013
marizannek
May 22nd, 2013
marizannek
In our latest Futurist Forum live discussion, Glen Hiemstra, founder of Futurist.com, will look at how work will evolve over the next several decades both in America and globally. Work is in the process of becoming more knowledge intensive, but it is easy to exaggerate the importance of this trend. The job as we understood it is disappearing, even as history is likely to repeat itself and produce unprecedented levels of employment. There will be jobs in the future, ranging from the familiar, like dental assistants, to the exotic, like brain augmenters. What will the jobs be and how can one best prepare?
Reblogged from The Social Business
May 22nd, 2013
marizannek

Glen Hiemstra, Futures Agency member, talks about what we can expect in the near future.

February 14th, 2013
gabrieleruttloff

The Future in 50 , 100 , 200 Years

Glen Hiemstra Interviewed on Daily Planet, Discovery Channel Canada 2013:

“On January 9, 2013 Discovery Channel Canada broadcast a short interview with me on the show Daily Planet. The questions had to do with developments that I see in 50 years, 100 years, 200 years. I did a lot of thinking prior to the interview about these time frames, and I’ll be summarizing these ideas in blogs to come, perhaps one grand article.

One question was, “what will be a breakthrough similar to the Internet in 50 and 100 and 200 years?” My thoughts began with the idea of the disappearance in 50 years of the boundary between what we now think of as the online and offline (or real) worlds. In 50 years, devices we carry or imbed will have so completely integrated these two worlds that there will only be “the world” and that world will…read on.” -> video

January 31st, 2013
futuristspeaker

The Future in 50 Years, 100 Years, 200 Years

By Glen Hiemstra, Futurist.com

On January 9, 2013 Discovery Channel Canada broadcast a short interview with me on the show Daily Planet. The questions had to do with developments that I see in 50 years, 100 years, 200 years. I did a lot of thinking prior to the interview about these time frames, and I’ll be summarizing these ideas in blogs to come, perhaps one grand article.

One question was, “what will be a breakthrough similar to the Internet in 50 and 100 and 200 years?” My thoughts began with the idea of the disappearance in 50 years of the boundary between what we now think of as the online and offline (or real) worlds. In 50 years, devices we carry or imbed will have so completely integrated these two worlds that there will only be “the world” and that world will combine the real and the virtual in a seemless and constant way.

For now, link to the 3 minute video interview here. Discovery uses some nice graphics to illustrate our conversation.

Glen Hiemstra Interviewed on Daily Planet, Discovery Channel Canada 2013

September 5th, 2012
futuristspeaker

Jason Silva on the advantage of being awestruck. Terrific. Enjoy.

August 15th, 2012
futuristspeaker

What Mars Means to Earth

I am a fan of Mars. I think people will live there one day. Really. So I was quite excited to watch the NASA/JPL live feed last night of the landing of Curiosity, the largest craft ever soft landed on another planet, and to share vicariously in the moment. Watch it here.

Then today my friend and colleague Mark Anderson, of Strategic News Service (I serve on the advisory board for his annual conference, Future in Review), published the following Special Alert about the landing. In Mark’s classic and hard-hitting way he tackles what the accomplishment should mean for science, and politics.

Read More

August 9th, 2012
futuristspeaker

Entrepeneurs creating fewer jobs

Here in the U.S. it is an article of faith that the economy is driven by entrepreneurs – job creators in the current political parlance. And there is no question that the U.S. maintains an entrepreneurial culture.

But, something is happening that may represent an emergent trend. Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics illustrates that the years 1993 to 2001 were peak years in the creation of new companies. It is not surprising that new company “births” fell off after the dot com bust in 2000, increased a bit in 2004-2006, the peak of the debt bubble, and then fell off a cliff with the arrival of the recession in 2007. The fall off in new company formations is the steepest in the history of this data series. At the same time, company deaths kept climbing.

Read More

August 3rd, 2012
gabrieleruttloff

Drove my Chevy to the levy and pushed it in – The Future of Cars

Found on Glen Hiemstra’s Futurist.com: “Beware the permanent trend.

What would happen if a generation stopped driving cars, or at least stopped dreaming that owning a car and driving everywhere was their defining passage into adulthood? What if each year auto ownership and miles driven declined? It would be the end of a seemingly permanent trend toward ever more miles driven and greater car ownership.

I first began seeing signs of this emerging trend (or better, trend reversal) in 2010, as I was producing a study for the state of Idaho on the 30-year future of transportation and economic development in Idaho. In that study I noted the following, based on a 2010 article in Advertising Age:

The Millennial generation…is not only very large – larger than the Baby Boom generation – but different in an important way. They are first computer and Internet generations, having grown up since infancy with computers, 24/7 network access, cell phones, blue-tooth enabled cars, and so on. They approach most life activities differently, that is, they approach them using the network first.

One critical example for the future is recent research showing, for the first time since the advent of the automobile, a youth generation less likely to…read on.”

July 19th, 2012
futuristspeaker

Micro Homes: The Competitive Alternative to Housing

Micro homes, or tiny houses, are becoming more appealing as affordable housing options are less and less abundant in cities with overcrowded populations. This increasing density issue will be a topic of conversation in a book I’m co-authoring late this Fall on the future of cities, but until then the focus is on micro homes as a possible answer to this increasing lack of space.

Read More