April 19th, 2014
marizannek

Why Playful Learning Is The Key To Prosperity

"In order for our global society to develop solutions to pressing problems in an increasingly technology-driven and constantly changing world, we need to re-train our workforce to do what machines can’t: to be enterprising, independent and strategic thinkers—to be purposeful creators.”

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ashoka/2014/04/10/why-playful-learning-is-the-key-to-prosperity/?utm_campaign=forbestwittersf&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social 

April 10th, 2014
marizannek

fastcompany:

From teaching government a thing or two about education reform to deploying a data-centric learning platform that even a kid could use, these are the World’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies In Education. Read more>

Reblogged from Fast Company
June 16th, 2013
marizannek
futuretechreport:

10 Ways 3D Printing Can Be Used In Education [Infographic]
Remember when you had to make a diorama with a shoe box and construction paper in school? Well with 3D printers - your kids’ version are going to be actual replicas! 

futuretechreport:

10 Ways 3D Printing Can Be Used In Education [Infographic]

Remember when you had to make a diorama with a shoe box and construction paper in school? Well with 3D printers - your kids’ version are going to be actual replicas! 

Reblogged from Futurescope
June 8th, 2013
marizannek
“Coding will be the key to innovation in the future but many students, but especially low-income students, aren’t exposed to it,” she says. Tech moguls including Bill Gates, Google’s Eric Schmidt and Meg Whitman from Hewlett-Packard agree with her. They’ve thrown their weight behind Code.org, a new nonprofit whose “learn to code” videos have gone viral. They say that coding, programming and computer science will be the language of the 21st century. “In a world that’s increasingly run on technology, computer science is a liberal art that every student should be exposed to, regardless of their path in life,” says Code.org’s Hadi Partovi. Labor economists say Partovi might be right. By 2020, the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics is projecting that 778,000 computer jobs will be created. “That is substantial growth that is expected to outpace the growth of the overall economy,” says Martin Kohli, a chief regional economist there. Jan Cuny, who oversees the National Science Foundation’s CS10K initiative, a $40 million program aimed at getting more computer science teachers in high school classroom, says those projections are low. She estimates that 1.4 million jobs—and 60 percent of the STEM jobs of the future—will require computing skills. They are good jobs too. In 2012, according to the BLS, the average salary for a computer programmer was about $80,000. (By comparison, the average wage for American workers is $45,800.)
Reblogged from Infoneer Pulse
June 2nd, 2013
marizannek
It’s time to stop thinking of computer programming as a specialty subject. Schools should respect it as a fundamental skill.
Reblogged from Infoneer Pulse
May 30th, 2013
marizannek
May 25th, 2013
marizannek

emergentfutures:

In Cisco’s Classroom Of The Future, Your Professor Is Just An Illusion

New telepresence software could let you take a class from anywhere and appear as if you’re in the classroom.

Full Story: FastCoExist

May 14th, 2013
marizannek

future-drama:

Google Glass & teaching.


Comment: Wow, that is pretty cool.

Reblogged from Future Drama