July 2nd, 2013
futuristgerd

20 Searches [through Glass] (by Project Glass)

Comments Gerd Leonhard: watch this video for a glimpse of the future - so how dependent on technology will we become …? Just like car navigation devices may have rendered many cab drivers useless if the GPS is not working, will we become ‘useless’ when the Internet is down or our devices are out of power?  Made me think, for sure.

June 27th, 2013
marizannek

fastcompany:

Google’s Project Loon (say ‘loon balloon’ five times fast) will use solar-powered giant devices hovering 12 miles above the ground to beam Internet down to places where it’s not possible to lay cable.

Reblogged from Fast Company
June 22nd, 2013
marizannek

8bitfuture:

Google’s internet balloons launch in New Zealand.

30 balloons were launched from Tekapo, New Zealand this week as part of a larger plan to “connect the 2 out of every 3 people on Earth” who don’t have an internet connection.

The balloons are solar powered, and expand to 15 meters in diameter when fully inflated. At 20km high, the balloons are well above commercial aircraft and most weather activity.

Google chose New Zealand to show how the technology could be deployed in a remote area (and possibly to have a vacation in an awesome spot - I’m going to Tekapo this week too!). The nearby city of Christchurch also suffered power and internet outages after earthquakes in 2010 and 2011, so Google is aiming to show how the system could quickly deploy to provide internet access in a disaster.

The next step in the trial is to have a string of up to 300 balloons forming a ring on the 40th parallel south from New Zealand through Australia, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay and Argentina.

Reblogged from 8 Bit Future
June 15th, 2013
marizannek
June 11th, 2013
marizannek
Reblogged from
May 31st, 2013
futuristgerd
May 31st, 2013
marizannek
Absurdity is not a barrier to consideration. Teller and colleagues say they’ve spent time contemplating levitation and teleportation. The latter was nixed as an area for further study in part because any unique item that you would want to teleport—a Picasso, say—would have to be completely destroyed before it could be reconstituted on the other end.
Reblogged from The Verge
May 24th, 2013
futuristgerd