April 19th, 2014
marizannek

Why Playful Learning Is The Key To Prosperity

"In order for our global society to develop solutions to pressing problems in an increasingly technology-driven and constantly changing world, we need to re-train our workforce to do what machines can’t: to be enterprising, independent and strategic thinkers—to be purposeful creators.”

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ashoka/2014/04/10/why-playful-learning-is-the-key-to-prosperity/?utm_campaign=forbestwittersf&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social 

April 18th, 2014
marizannek
Reblogged from The Red Read
April 17th, 2014
marizannek
April 16th, 2014
marizannek
newsweek:

In the last two months, Amazon has spotlighted two new products that allow shoppers to add items to their shopping list without ever typing anything into a search bar. This isn’t a coincidence.
The most recent one is Amazon Dash — a thin, wand-like device, revealed on Friday, that includes both a microphone and a barcode scanner. Speak into it or scan a box of cereal or pack of toilet paper to automatically add that product to your AmazonFresh shopping list.
For now, it is available only on a trial basis to Amazon customers in San Francisco and Los Angeles who pay for Amazon’s new Prime Fresh membership, which includes grocery delivery.
Before Dash, Amazon announced in February that it was adding a technology called Flow to its main shopping app on mobile phones. A user taps on the Flow feature in the app, points the phone at a product in their home — say, a book or a bottle of shampoo — and Flow is supposed to quickly display the product page on the phone’s screen.
Both Dash and Flow seem a bit gimmicky now. And I have no idea whether either will ever move past that stage and toward mass adoption. But they are both signs that Amazon is seriously thinking about how to remove as much friction as possible for people who are looking to buy a specific item from Amazon, but are on the move and not sitting behind a desk staring at a computer screen.
Amazon Dash and The Race To Slash The Time Between “Want” and “Buy” | Re/code

newsweek:

In the last two months, Amazon has spotlighted two new products that allow shoppers to add items to their shopping list without ever typing anything into a search bar. This isn’t a coincidence.

The most recent one is Amazon Dash — a thin, wand-like device, revealed on Friday, that includes both a microphone and a barcode scanner. Speak into it or scan a box of cereal or pack of toilet paper to automatically add that product to your AmazonFresh shopping list.

For now, it is available only on a trial basis to Amazon customers in San Francisco and Los Angeles who pay for Amazon’s new Prime Fresh membership, which includes grocery delivery.

Before Dash, Amazon announced in February that it was adding a technology called Flow to its main shopping app on mobile phones. A user taps on the Flow feature in the app, points the phone at a product in their home — say, a book or a bottle of shampoo — and Flow is supposed to quickly display the product page on the phone’s screen.

Both Dash and Flow seem a bit gimmicky now. And I have no idea whether either will ever move past that stage and toward mass adoption. But they are both signs that Amazon is seriously thinking about how to remove as much friction as possible for people who are looking to buy a specific item from Amazon, but are on the move and not sitting behind a desk staring at a computer screen.

Amazon Dash and The Race To Slash The Time Between “Want” and “Buy” | Re/code

Reblogged from Newsweek
April 14th, 2014
marizannek

futurescope:

A Guide to the Internet of Things by Intel

[read more]

Reblogged from Futurescope
April 12th, 2014
marizannek
According to the Oxford study, “occupations that involve complex perception and manipulation tasks, creative intelligence tasks, and social intelligence tasks are unlikely to be substituted by computer capital over the next decade or two.”
April 11th, 2014
marizannek
April 10th, 2014
marizannek

fastcompany:

From teaching government a thing or two about education reform to deploying a data-centric learning platform that even a kid could use, these are the World’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies In Education. Read more>

Reblogged from Fast Company
April 9th, 2014
marizannek

futurescope:

162 Future Jobs: Preparing for Jobs that Don’t Yet Exist

Stunning post by Thomas Frey on wfs.org about new jobs and skills in the near and far future. Who else wants to be a Robotic Earthworm Driver, a Bio-Meat Factory Engineer or a Driverless “Ride Experience” Designers. Fun to read.

Predicting future jobs is an exercise that involves looking at future industries and speculating on ways in which they will be different than the workforce today. Business management, engineering, accounting, marketing, and sales are all necessary skills for the future, but the work involved will also be different.

At the same time there will be many less-obvious positions that will need to be created. This is about those less-obvious positions.

The following is not an exhaustive list, nor do these job titles all have good explanations. Rather, this column is intended to be a thought-generator, an idea-sparker, to help you draw your own conclusions.

[Full List] [careers 2030]

Reblogged from Futurescope
April 6th, 2014
marizannek

futurescope:

Keeping secrets in a world of spies and mistrust

Artur Ekert, co-inventor of quantum cryptography, explains in Nature what it takes to keep our secrets secret, even when faced with the double challenge of mistrust and manipulation.

Want to learn more? See the article “The ultimate physical limits of privacy” in Nature:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13132

Or this summary on CQT’s website: http://www.quantumlah.org/highlight/1…

Artur Ekert is Director of the Centre for Quantum Technologies and Lee Kong Chian Centennial Professor, National University of Singapore, Professor of Quantum Physics at the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, UK

Abstract of Nature paper

Among those who make a living from the science of secrecy, worry and paranoia are just signs of professionalism. Can we protect our secrets against those who wield superior technological powers? Can we trust those who provide us with tools for protection? Can we even trust ourselves, our own freedom of choice? Recent developments in quantum cryptography show that some of these questions can be addressed and discussed in precise and operational terms, suggesting that privacy is indeed possible under surprisingly weak assumptions.

[via kurzweilAI] [Paper]

Reblogged from Futurescope